High School Courses

 

AESA Prep Academy’s High School Courses are accredited by SACS, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and NCAA Approved.

Mathematics curriculum is aligned by grade and satisfies the National Standards and Principals for Mathematics Science Education Standards and is supported by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, as well as the SAT Reasoning Test developed by the College Board, and the ACT, the American College Test governed by ACT Inc.

The Science curriculum is aligned by grade and satisfies the National Science Education Standards developed by the National Science Council supported by the National Science Teachers Association, as well as the SAT Reasoning Test developed by the College Board, and the ACT, the American College Test governed by ACT Inc.

The Social Studies curriculum is aligned by grade and satisfies the National Standards for Social Studies supported by the National Council for the Social Studies, as well as the SAT Reasoning Test developed by the College Board, and the ACT, the American College Test governed by ACT Inc.

The English curriculum is aligned by grade and satisfies the National Standards for English supported by the Main English Teachers Group, as well as the SAT Reasoning Test developed by the College Board, and the ACT, the American College Test governed by ACT Inc.

Check out the 2017 / 2018 Course Selection Catalog for more information!

Also check our Dual Credit Program to learn it works and how it benefits AESA students!

9th Grade Academic Courses

English 1 (1 credit)

English I will provide an in-depth study of English literature and poetry with an emphasis on critical thinking skills and analyzing and the use of literary devices (plot, theme, character development, etc.). There will also be a strong emphasis on writing (essays, research, persuasive, etc.) along with daily grammar exercises.This course is an introductory survey of literature, with an emphasis on reading, writing, and analytical skills. Students utilize critical thinking skills to analyze and interpret reading selections from specific time periods, diverse cultures and various genres of literature including fiction, non-fiction, short stories, novels, poetry and drama. Vocabulary skills are strengthened through weekly tests in preparation for the SAT and ACT. SAT and ACT Skills are woven throughout this course. Students will demonstrate proficiency of the writing process through narrative, persuasive, and expository writing with an introduction to research writing. Grammar and punctuation skills will be developed as well

There will be 5 novel studies which will encompass all aspects of literature and writing.
Animal Farm by George Orwell, Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, The Odyssey by Homer, Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, 5th novel to be chosen by student from a provided list.

 

Algebra 1 (1 credit)

This one-year college preparatory course will help students to view algebra not only as a theoretical tool for analyzing and describing mathematical relationships, but they will also experience the power of algebraic thinking in a context of applications by studying the mathematical modeling of real world problems.

In the first semester of Algebra I, students are introduced to functions, using tables and graphs, multiple representations of functions, exploring linear functions, rate of change, the parent function, writing rules, connecting functions to equations and inequalities, using commutative, associative, and distributive properties to simplify expressions, solving simple equations with manipulatives and symbols, solving equations of the Form kx + c = b and kx + c = mx + b, looking closer at inequalities and comparing notations and methods.

The second semester of Algebra I introduces students to systems of linear equation, solving systems using graphs and tables, solving systems by symbolic methods, area and perimeter functions, the parent function multiplied by a constant, adding and subtracting a constant, multiple changes to the parent function, binomial operations, modeling with quadratic functions, solving quadratic equations, graphs of exponential functions, and modeling inverse variation data.

Algebra 1 is designed for 9th grade students but occasionally 7th and 8th grade students are prepared for this level of math course.

Biology (1 credit)

Topics taught in class are the following: bio-molecules, enzymes, prokaryotic cells, eukaryotic cells, cellular organelles, plasma membrane and membrane transport, osmosis, diffusion, mitosis, DNA replication, protein synthesis, mutations, energy and ATP, leaf structure and leaf pigments, stages of photosynthesis, transport of materials in plants, cellular respiration, community ecology, biological communities, population dynamics, asexual and sexual reproduction, meiosis, plant reproduction, human reproduction, menstrual cycle, genetics, karyotypes, ethics of genetics, careers in biotechnology, sex-linked traits, genetic screening, evolution, diversity of life, natural selection, plant adaptations, human body systems, the immune system, and identifying diseases.

World Geography (1 credit)

This course examines environmental factors such as climate, topography and natural resources throughout the world. It also explores population distribution and growth and their effect on the world’s population. The study of varied customs and cultural characteristics of world societies, as well as productivity and consumption of natural resources on a global scale are also main aspects of this class. Regions covered are the United States, Canada, Middle, Central, and South America, Caribbean Islands, Caribbean South America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and Antarctica.

10th Grade Academic Courses

English 2 - World Literature (1 credit)

English II is a survey of world literature. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and analytical skills. Students utilize critical thinking skills to analyze and interpret reading selections from specific time periods, diverse cultures and various genres of American literature including fiction, non-fiction, short stories, novels, poetry and drama.

Vocabulary skills in preparation for the SAT and ACT are emphasized and tested regularly. In a weekly “Writer’s Workshop”, students will demonstrate proficiency of the writing process through narrative, persuasive, and expository writing. Students will learn to research and write a research paper in MLA format. Grammar and punctuation skills will be developed as well.

There will be 5 novel studies which will encompass all aspects of literature and writing.
Flags of Our Fathers by James Bradley, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Native Son by Richard Wright, Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, 5th novel to be chosen by student from a provided list.

Geometry (1 credit)

This is a one-year college preparatory Geometry course for the accelerated mathematics student. The course content will include a rigorous in-depth study of geometric concepts from an algebraic perspective. Included in this course is a study of both two and three dimensional shapes, congruence, similarity, transformations and the relationships between geometric shapes.
The first semester of Geometry introduces students to points, lines and planes, segments and distances, angles and angle measures, patterns, perpendicular bisectors and angle bisectors, points of concurrency in triangles, conditional statements, geometric systems, isometrics, parallel lines, slopes of lines, composite transfer, triangle properties, isosceles and equilateral triangles, proving triangles congruent, and constructing perpendiculars and parallels.

The second semester of Geometry covers similar polygons, right triangles, the Pythagorean Theorem, special right triangles, right triangle trigonometry, properties of quadrilaterals, properties of parallelograms, proving quadrilaterals and parallelograms, properties of special parallelograms, trapezoids and kites, circles in the coordinate plane, properties of tangents, areas of plane figures, circles: circumference and arc length, circles, areas, sectors and segments, representing 3-D figures, prisms and cylinders in the real world, pyramids and cones in the real world, sphere and plane sections, surface area of cylinders and prisms, surface area of pyramids and cones, volumes of cylinders, prisms, pyramids and cones, coordinates and dimensional change, and three-dimensional coordinates.

If a student expects to study Calculus as a 12th grader, this course should be taken in the 9th grade, with Algebra 1 taken in the 8th grade.

Chemistry (1 credit)

Chemistry covers topics and information normally contained in a first-year college general chemistry course. Chemistry is the science of matter and the changes it undergoes.

This course examines Chemistry by introducing students to the following aspects: chemical reactions, the scientific method, characteristics of matter and its states, chromatography, physical and chemical changes, the law of conservation of mass, measurements in chemistry, accuracy, precision, significant digits, atomic theory, models of atoms, electron configurations, orbital notation, atomic mass, periodic table and its trends, nuclear chemistry, fission , fusion, half-lives of radioactive elements, nuclear reactors, oxidation numbers, polyvalent metals, polyatomic ions, chemical formulas, chemical names, naming binary molecular compounds, naming acids, organic compounds, molar mass, mole calculations, percent composition, empirical and molecular formulas, valence electrons, electronegativity, ionic bonds, covalent bonds, chemical reactions, Stoichiometry, limiting reagents, percent yield, aqueous systems, reaction rates and equilibrium, and chemical applications in the real world.

World History (1 credit)

Students will examine and analyze historic, geographic, political and economic concepts and issues. The focus is on the United States in the second half of the 20th century through the present and its relationship to the rest of the world through four lenses: United States’ perspective, international perspective, geography, and economics.

11th Grade Academic Courses

English 3 - American Literature (1 credit)

This course is a survey of American literature, spanning the early 1600’s through contemporary literature. Students will encounter writing from the Native American period and the Colonial Period through contemporary literature. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and analytical skills. Students utilize critical thinking skills to analyze and interpret reading selections from specific time periods, diverse cultures and various genres of American literature including fiction, non-fiction, short stories, novels, poetry and drama.

Vocabulary skills in preparation for the SAT and ACT are emphasized and tested regularly. Students will demonstrate proficiency of the writing process through narrative, persuasive, and expository writing. Students will learn to research and write a research paper in MLA format. Grammar and punctuation skills will be developed as well.

There will be 5 novel studies which will encompass all aspects of literature and writing.
Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko, Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton, As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner, A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry, 5th novel to be chosen by student from a provided list.

Algebra 2 (1 credit)

This is a one-year college preparatory course that will help students view algebra not only as a theoretical tool for analyzing and describing mathematical relationships, they will also experience the power of algebraic thinking in the context of application by studying the mathematical modeling of real world problems.

Algebra 2 is usually the third math course that is taken in High School, with Geometry in between, and builds upon the information and skills students have acquired in Algebra 1 and aspects of Geometry. This course will focus on the concepts of functions and relations with emphasis on linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, and rational functions.

Algebraic concepts are used in a variety of real-world situations than can be modeled mathematically. The students will learn about rational functions and their properties, investigate the effects of horizontal and vertical translations, solve rational equations and inequalities by graphing and by solving algebraically, compare direct and indirect relations, define the General Exponential Function using Carbon-14 dating, population and other models, discover the number e, use continuous compound interest, use logarithmic functions as the inverse of an exponential function with common and natural logarithmic functions, learn how to use the properties of logarithm and using properties of logarithms in applications, and define conics such as parabolas, ellipses, circles and hyperbolas using the General and Standard Forms of the Equations of a Conic.

Physics (1 credit)

This mathematically rigorous course is equivalent to an introductory college-level physics course. Physics is considered to be the third or fourth science course in high school.

Physics is the study of matter and energy and their interactions. It produces a systematic understanding of the fundamental laws that govern physical, chemical and biological processes.

Some of the topics students study are the following: kinetic energy and its relationship to heat, convection, conduction, and radiation; the first law of thermodynamics; the second law of thermodynamics; the third law of thermodynamics; the harmonic motion and waves; reflection, interference, standing waves, sound reasoning, characterizing sound, resonance and forced vibration; the Doppler effect; the behavior of light, the scattering of light, and bending light; elements of quantum physics; spectrographs; medical and industrial applications of light, electricity and magnetism, electric circuits, current, voltage, resistance, series and parallel circuits; electromagnetic induction; electric motors; electric generator; quantum optics; the photon; photoelectric effect; atomic models; dualism of matter; review of scientific techniques; scientific processes and measurement; models and graphs; position; speed; velocity; acceleration, motion, projectile motion, and uniform circular motion; Newton’s Laws, gravity as a force, force as a vector quantity, centripetal force, momentum, impulse and impact, kinetic energy, and gravitational potential energy; Hooke’s Law; elastic potential energy; the work-energy theorem; and conservation of energy and momentum.

U.S. History (1 credit)

The purpose of this course is to increase students’ knowledge of the development of the United States as a democratic nation. The course is organized as a chronological survey of the American past from 1877 to World War II. Emphasis will be placed on major events, geography, individuals and ideas which comprise our American heritage.

12th Grade Academic Courses

English 4 - British Literature (1 credit)

This course is a survey of British literature from the Renaissance period through Romanticism and Modernism. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and analytical skills. Students utilize critical thinking skills to analyze and interpret reading selections from specific time periods, diverse cultures and various genres of British literature including fiction, non-fiction, short stories, novels, poetry and drama.

Vocabulary skills in preparation for the SAT and ACT are emphasized and tested regularly. Students will demonstrate proficiency of the writing process through narrative, persuasive, and expository writing. Students will learn to research and write a research paper in MLA format. Grammar and punctuation skills will be developed as well.

There will be 5 novel studies which will encompass all aspects of literature and writing.
Beowulf, Hamlet by William Shakespeare, Dracula by Bram Stoker, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, 5th novel to be chosen by student from a provided list.

PreCalculus (1 credit)

Pre-Calculus is designed to prepare college-bound students for a first course in Calculus. It combines the topics of trigonometry, elementary analysis, and analytic geometry. Pre-Calculus builds on the concepts and skills learned in Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2. An intuitive base and some working tools for the study of more advanced mathematics are developed.

The students will use system of inequalities to solve linear and quadratic inequalities, solve polynomials and rational inequalities, use rational, exponential, and logarithmic function to prove properties of logarithms and to solve exponential growth and decay, graph polar equations in the form of complex numbers using products, quotients, powers and roots of complex numbers, use conics to solve equations of circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, and parabolas, solve problems using the basic operations of matrices and vectors, use sequence and series to identify arithmetic and geometric series, use limits of sequence, sums of infinite series and power series, and introduce students to Calculus using limits of a function of a real variable and limit theorems and find derivatives.

Environmental Science (1 credit)

This course is designed to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the many ecosystems that inhabit the earth, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. There are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental systems. Students are introduced to complex environmental issues that include environmental quality, plant systems, human resources, conservation, pollution, and ecosystems. This involves the study of biology, chemistry, and demography that deals with the interaction between man and nature.

U.S. Government (.5 credit)

U.S. Government will focus on the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute United States politics. Students will gain an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States both by studying the general concepts used to interpret U. S. politics and by analyzing specific examples. Students will learn how to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to U. S. government and politics and will write extensively to perfect their essay writing and critical thinking skills.

In this course, students apply knowledge gained in previous years of study to pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American Government. In addition, they draw on their studies of world and American history and geography and other societies to compare differences and similarities in world governmental systems today.

This course is the culmination of history/social sciences classes to prepare students to solve society’s problems, to understand and to participate in the governmental process, and to be a responsible citizen of the United States and the world.

Principles of Economics (.5 credit)

This course consists of an introductory examination into the study of Economics. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of how individuals and societies function through economic practices. Topics include basic economic components, the organizational structure of the economy, money and banking, markets, governmental roles and economic indicators. This course introduces concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester.

Calculus I (1 credit) *accelerated student math credit

This is a one-year course designed for the accelerated 12th grade mathematics student who is considering advanced placement in college or wishes to have maximum preparation for college calculus.

The course content will include a study the mathematics of change and motion, linear and quadratic functions, trigonometry, log functions, and determining area and volumes.

Recommendation: Satisfactory completion of Pre-Calculus.

Calculus is not required for the Distinguished Diploma: students may take Pre-Cal instead.

Foreign Languages

The Foreign Language curriculum is aligned by grade and satisfies the National Standards for Foreign Language Education and is supported by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language, as well as the SAT Reasoning Test developed by the College Board, and the ACT, the American College Test governed by ACT Inc.  Students are encouraged to take Dual Credit Spanish from the University of Texas for their Advanced Foreign Languages Classes.

Spanish

Spanish 1 (1 credit)

This is an introductory Spanish class designed for students that do not desire to take dual credit Spanish classes. Students will learn the basics of speaking and writing in Spanish. Students will also explore the cultures of Spanish speaking countries and the countries that primarily speak Spanish.

Spanish 2 (1 credit)

This course continues to develop the oral skills with added emphasis on reading and writing skills. The focus is on expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Contrast between English and Spanish strengthen the language learning process. Culturally related activities of selected Hispanic countries and regions will be explored.

Spanish 3 (1 credit)

This course meets the requirements of Spanish collegiate studies. It stresses the development of fluency in oral skills, comprehension of Spanish literature and history, expository composition, and expanded use of grammar. It focuses on the development of accuracy and fluency.Utilizes high-level/critical thinking and focuses on the development of accuracy and fluency.

This course is conducted predominantly in Spanish.

Spanish 4 (Advanced )(1 credit)

This course is available upon request. It is designed for the highly advanced Spanish student and will be tailored for the individual needs of the students. Course work will focus on conversational Spanish at a high level as well as advanced writing skills.

French

French I (1 credit)

An introduction to basic grammar, vocabulary, and development of communication skills in French. Students will use a variety of authentic text and media resources to acquire and enhance linguistic skills. The first semester is designed for students with no knowledge of, or with a weak background in French. The second semester is designed for students with limited previous exposure to French.

French 2 (1 credit)

An accelerated review of basic French grammar through speaking, reading, and writing. The introduction of more advanced grammatical structures and a variety of authentic text and multimedia resources will enhance the students’ linguistic skills and sociocultural awareness of the French speaking world.

French 3 (1 credit)

This is a French course for students that speak French fluently and are able to read contemporary literature such as the Harry Potter books, in French.

French 4 (Advanced) (1 credit)

This course is available upon request. It is designed for the highly advanced French student and will be tailored for the individual needs of the students. Course work will focus on conversational French at a high level as well as advanced writing skills.

Mandarin Chinese

Mandarin Chinese 1 (1 credit)

This course is an introductory course to Mandarin Chinese teaching the student basic verbal and written vocabulary and grammar. Students will learn how to use the pinyin to get the pronunciation and common conversational Mandarin. Students will also learn how to write Chinese characters and short sentences. For level1, the course will focus on self-information and basic noun. This course will introduce Chinese culture, students will have chance to experience it. Students will play a variety of games using Mandarin Chinese.

Mandarin Chinese 2 (1 credit)

This course is a continuing introductory course to Mandarin Chinese teaching the student basic verbal and written vocabulary and grammar. Students will continue to learn how to use the pinyin to get the pronunciation and common conversational Mandarin. Students will also learn how to write Chinese characters and short paragraphs.

Electives

Professional Fields

Medical Microbiology (1 credit)

This is an introductory course in immunology and microbiology. Students will gain familiarity with the biological characteristics of important microbial pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites.

The course will cover epidemiology, mechanisms and routes of transmission, pathogenesis and immunity, host response, control, and prevention. Laboratory activities will enhance understanding of course material. This course is designed primarily for those planning careers in medicine, pharmacy, nursing, dental hygiene, and related fields.

Pre-requisite: Biology and Chemistry

Introduction to Law (1 credit)

This course consists of an introductory examination into the study of Law. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the historical development of laws, basic legal principles and concepts, and the many areas of legal practice. Classes will be engaging, participative and thought provoking.

Introduction to Engineering (1 credit)

This course consists of an introductory examination into the study of Engineering. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the historical development of engineering, the use of multiple subjects including mathematics, chemistry, physics, etc., and bringing together scientific understanding to real world problems. Classes will review basic engineering principles, an introduction to the many different engineering disciplines, and case study of engineering successes and failures.

Introduction to Business (1 credit)

This course consists of an introductory examination into the study of Business Administration. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the historical steps in the development of modern business practices, cover in greater detail key disciplines within the study of business including: budgeting, scheduling, strategic planning, marketing (both products and services), organizational behavior, human resources and basic project management. The course will wrap up with a review of business case studies that highlight both successes and failures.

Communications

Debate 1 and 2 (1 credit each)

Debate is a year long course that provides instruction in the art of public speaking, with an emphasis on specific debating techniques. Students will have the opportunity to develop critical thinking and analytic skills along with logic and impromptu speaking techniques to defend opposing sides of social issues. The course is designed to further students’ research skills and promote an awareness and understanding of political and current-event issues.

Students will find themselves learning various formats of debate including: Lincoln-Douglas, Public Forum (a type of team debate), and Extemporaneous Speaking (impromptu speeches analyzing current events). Most of the course focuses on the in-class debating of major political and ethical issues. Major concepts to be taught include, case-writing, rebuttals, cross-examination skills, analytical thinking, and political and moral philosophy.

Speech 1 and 2 (1 credit each)

This elective course will teach students how to write, prepare, edit, and give a speech in a variety of situations. Areas of emphasis will include: knowing your audience, conquering stage fright, body language, stage presence, humor as a key component and developing the ability to relay informative or persuasive content. This will be a dynamic class where every student will be getting up and talking in front of the other students during each and every session! Through immersion, repetition, and fun classroom exercises, students will learn how to grab the audience’s attention and how to hold it. They will simultaneously learn how to relax and be themselves in front of any size audience, therefore giving a much more effective speech. Students will also learn the process of writing a speech for a variety of settings or occasions. Appropriate videos of different speakers in different situations will be shown as examples. These will include motivational speeches, stand up comedy routines, informational speeches, and persuasive speeches. The course will conclude with the students giving a speech from a category of their choosing to assembled students and parents. Grades will be based on student participation during class, enthusiasm for the coursework, and on improvement from day one to the final speech.

At the end of the course, students will:
Know how to relax and be confident while addressing an audience.
Be able to prepare an effective speech for any situation.
Feel confident in their ability to address large and small groups of people.
Stand up straighter, be more confident, and feel empowered to get up and speak!

English

Creative Writing (1 credit each)

There’s good writing, and then there’s writing that sings. This course will push students’ work toward the melodious. We will work on techniques to raise the level of the language—from creating strong word pictures to turning phrases to finding and highlighting the telling details—and ways to keep readers’ interest, such as developing strong hooks and building a solid spine. The types of writing we work on will be determined partly by student interest, but could include essays, narrative non-fiction, short fiction and, at the end of the year, poetry (classic form as well as music lyrics). Guest writers will be brought to class to discuss their work and method, and students will have the opportunity for writing-related field trips, such as poetry slams. We will read and dissect published examples of specific genres to learn about construction and literary devices, and then students will try their own hand. Through classroom readings, peer comments and teacher editing, students will improve their work and leave the class with a strong sense of how to hit the high notes.

Literature Studies (1 credit each)

This course will study novels and short stories from a variety of genres, time periods, and authors. Students will analyze literature through independent study, Socratic discussion, and collaborative literature circles. Students will develop their literary analysis skills and receive detailed individual feedback to improve writing. ***Ideal students are avid and self-motivated readers.***

Novel Writing (1 credit)

Do you want to write a novel but you’re not sure where to begin? Have you started a novel, only to find yourself feeling lost? Has your story hit a brick wall? Do you feel that you’re missing some of the tools you need to write or finish a novel? Then this class is for you!

In this course, you’ll learn:
-how to write an opening chapter that hooks the reader and establishes the novel’s ground rules -how to create characters who live and breathe on the page
-how to choose the best point of view for your novel
-how to vividly depict the physical world of the story
-how to make every chapter buzz with suspense, no matter the genre

Journalism (1 credit)

Students are introduced to the historical importance of journalism in America. They study the basic principles of print and online journalism as they examine the role of printed news media in our society. They learn investigative skills, responsible reporting, and journalistic writing techniques as they read, respond to, and write their own news and feature articles. Students conduct interviews, research, write, and design their own publications.

Science

Anatomy and Physiology (1 credit each)

This course is an advanced study of the human body designed specifically for students with an interest in pursuing a career in a health-related field. The course covers the topics of human anatomical structure, physiological processes, homeostasis, anatomical and physiological disorders, medical diagnosis and treatment, biochemistry, cytology, and histology. Laboratory activities will reinforce concepts and principles presented in the course and will include several microscopic analyses of tissue specimens as well as dissections.

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry

Criminal and Forensic Psychology (1 credit each)

This course compares legal and psychological approaches to human … and forensic psychology and analyzes the roles of lawyers and of psychologists. Focuses on the paradigm differences in the mental health and legal systems and the challenges associated with integrating the two. Provides the students with an overview of the American legal system and the American mental health system. Discusses various areas of the intersection of the two systems in criminal, civil, juvenile, and family law settings. The role and ethics of the mental health professional in legal settings is addressed.

Integrative Nutrition (1 credit)

Discover the science behind nutrition. This class will discuss how current science explains, not only that “food is medicine” but is one of the most influential factors for preventing disease and providing a superior quality of life. This class will focus on how the interaction of food, nutrients, genes and the environment influence the body and brain’s ability to function at optimal levels. Research in the past 10 years has made many significant new findings. We will look at these in detail, discuss how they differ from past finding, as well as, how these new findings tell us our dietary habits are one of the most significant determining factors of one’s body and brain’s health. Science is learning how one’s intestinal flora (gut) and brain are connected and through this interaction what we put in our bodies affects the entire body’s ability to function.

In the second half of our class we will discuss sports nutrition, cooking, how to research nutrition on pubmed and applying lessons to real life. Explore if your current eating patterns are best for your body type or what changes would be best recommended for you and your specific body.

Health (1 credit)

Health education prepares students to shape their behavior in health enhancing ways. Students will learn to access valid and reliable health information, analyze the influences in their lives, communicate effectively, and use real life scenarios to practice making decisions and set attainable goals. Students will also watch various documentaries that involve emotional, physical, and nutrition wellness. By the end of this course, students will understand advanced health principles. The goal of this course is for students to develop the skills necessary to manage stress healthfully and enhance the quality of their personal, family, and community life.

Psychology (1 credit)

An introduction to psychological science — the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and group and cultural processes.

Technology

Computer Application (1 credit each)

This course will help students learn essential computer applications and Internet technology skills for personal, academic, and professional success. Students will effectively use a current Windows operating system and appropriate file management resources; develop and refine keyboarding skills on computers for speed and accuracy; apply word processing and desktop publishing functions to create, edit, manipulate, format, cite resources, print, and store common personal and business documents; apply spreadsheet functions to solve financial, mathematical, and statistical problems in business; create and edit charts and graphs to interpret spreadsheet data; design and create databases to extract, sort, calculate, and report business data; design, create, and execute an artistic and professional PowerPoint presentation which includes appropriate text formatting, graphics, animation, and public speaking skills, and use the Internet in an ethical manner to research, communicate, collaborate, and efficiently retrieve information.

Computer Science (1 credit each)

Computer Science introduces students to computer science concepts such as computer programs, computer aps, the internet, different networks, and the architecture of a computer. Students learn to operate various computer software programs, how to design their own software and produce finished software programs. This course is designed for students who plan on working in the computer software industry.

Fine Arts

Art Exploration 1 and 2 (1 credit each)

Explore all types of mediums and techniques as you learn the Principles and Elements of Art – in a fun way! This exploration will take you through drawing, painting, clay, sculpture and mixed media projects. During this time you will meet some artists that have come before you as we learn techniques in their style. This will be a great exposure to all types of art and you will leave the class with a better understanding of art terms and techniques to allow you to specialize in a specific art class later at AESA Prep Academy.

Art Studio 1 and 2 (1 credit each)

Studio Art is a course designed for the student who needs time to develop their art every day. Much as elite athletes need to practice daily, our artists are encouraged and supported in following a rigorous schedule to develop their creative ideas and skills. Studio Art is a small class that establishes fundamental skills in drawing, painting and digital arts while allowing students time and guidance to develop and produce their own creative ideas.

Individualized instruction and guidance will be provided to each student to help them produce concepts and refine skills.
Students are encouraged to participate in Studio Art regardless of their interest. Current students are pursuing projects in drawing, painting, digital photography, video production, anime, graphic design and more.

Drama 1, 2, 3, and 4 (1 credit each)

Theater is an immersive daily program that will be administered in a workshop format with an emphasis on acting, writing and directing for the stage. Improv will be a large part of the class, to encourage students to try different “voices” and become comfortable with thinking on their feet in a fast moving stage setting.

There will be two performances, one per semester. One will be a play and the other a selection of scenes that the students will be writing and directing themselves.
Students will be involved in all aspects of production. Grades are largely based on participation and enthusiasm.

Introduction to Photography and Digital Media (1 credit)

This elective course will help students understand the fundamentals of digital media, and will expose students to the worlds of: Digital Photography, Graphic Design Basics, and Video Production.

Areas of emphasis will include: How digital devices work: how to use your camera, how lighting works, how to compose and shoot a compelling image, how to print and share images, how to plan and produce a story through imagery.

Students will receive classroom instruction, field demonstration and see examples. They will be given opportunities to shoot images and receive personal instruction while in the field both in outdoor and indoor settings. Students will participate in constructive group critiques to review their work as we examine the fundamentals of photographic composition and visual impact. The course will conclude with a group exhibition featuring original work from each student. At the end of the course, students will know how to use the various features of their equipment, be able to decide what type of lighting to use in a given situation to produce optimum results, feel empowered to make deliberate creative choices, understand how to use editing software to produce images and videos, be able to publish and share their projects with others.

Physical Education

AESA Fitness Camp (1 credit)

The goal of the fitness class is to develop physical fitness in students. This class is designed to give students an opportunity to workout using your whole body for total fitness experience and have fun. We will use this class to build your fitness through total body workouts along side fun games that work different aspects of fitness. Think boot camp with games.

P.E. 1, 2, and 3 (1 credit each)

High School students learn lifetime-activities skills, knowledge & values. Including but not limited to outdoor pursuits, selected-performance activities, net/wall and target games. In addition upper level physical education classes will focus on physical fitness, cardio endurance, muscular endurance.

The goal of physical education is to develop physically literate individuals who have the knowledge, skills, and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity. To pursue a lifetime of healthful physical activity, a physically literate individual has:

1. Learned the skills necessary to participate in a variety of physical activities.

2. Knows the implications and the benefits of involvement in various types of physical activities.

3. Participates regularly in physical activity.

4. Is physically fit.

5. Values physical activity and its contributions to a healthful lifestyle.

Other

Comparative Religion (1 credit)

The study of world religions is an integral part of understanding individuals, countries, and nations. Many concepts in religion can be very abstract. Consequently, an effort has been made to create a course outline that simplifies the task at hand: teaching world religions in a manner that communicates abstract concepts in historical context with an understanding of diversity and sensitivity to individual beliefs.

This course outline relies upon a chronological and geographic approach. For units IA and IB a sequential approach is employed. Beginning with IC, a geographic approach is added. At this point the study of world religions is divided into eastern and western with Mesopotamia being the dividing line. Under the development of western religions a study of Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are included. Under the development of the eastern religions a study of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, Sikhism, Shinto, and religions of Korea and Japan are included. Although this is only one approach, by taking a geographic perspective, religions with similar history and features are automatically grouped. Additionally, the study of religions benefits from an approach that considers the three fundamental features of religions: theoretical, practical, and sociological. Finally, the study of religions is not limited to those included in this course outline. The included religions are those that have been historically studied as part of religious studies. The instructor should integrate other religions where appropriate.

Introduction to Logic (1 credit each)

In this course, we will learn the basics of symbolic logic — a method of reasoning that converts logical propositions and arguments to a system of symbols (variables, connectives, and operators), in order to make the critical analysis of arguments easier and less ambiguous. We will also take a close look at common logical fallacies, or mistakes commonly made in argumentative discourse. We will look at and analyze some famous arguments, as well as some arguments plucked from today’s headlines. We will also construct our own, and analyze each other’s, arguments. In this course, students can expect to engage in both algebra-like work with symbols, as well as in English-Composition-like writing — so, familiarity and comfort with both should be considered a prerequisite.

Practice of Statistics (1 credit each)

Practice of Statistics introduces probability and statistical concepts with applications to various disciplines using technological tools such as the TI 83+ graphing calculator and excel.

Topics include descriptive statistics such as measures of central tendency, variation, and positions; probability, conditional probability and probability distributions; inferential statistics include, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, chi-square test and regression and correlation.

Mythology (1 credit)

World Mythology explores the beliefs, cultures, and history of ancient societies from around the world in order to gain knowledge beneficial to the academic disciplines of literature, philosophy, art, comparative religion, science, anthropology, archeology, and psychology.

In this course students will: Interpret myths for their sociological, philosophical, and historical significance. Identify various universal archetypes, themes, symbols, and motifs found in myths. Analyze the cultural significance and relevance of important ancient stories (including The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aenied, The Epic of Gilgamesh, and Sigurd the Volsung). Develop a greater knowledge of the world cultures (including Greco-Roman, Norse, Judeo-Christian, Celtic, Mesoamerican, Native American, and Babylonian).

Students will improve their communication skills through many classroom discussions, multimedia presentations, and speeches.

Wildlife Program (1 credit)

In our Wildlife Program we use indoor and outdoor activities – including field trips to wilderness areas and other local resources – to explore such topics as biodiversity, habitats and ecosystems, interdependence, adaptation, wildlife populations, human impacts, wildlife management, and other current issues. We will also look for responsible actions that we can take, to benefit one or more causes that we identify and explore. Our program largely will be based on the award-winning “Project Wild” curriculum, which has been developed by a consortium of state, national, and international environmental educators.

This program is designed for the Elementary and Middle School students. High School Students may receive credit for taking this course performing the duties of a TA; a Teaching Assistant. There is room for two TA’s for this course.

Film History (1 credit)

Cinema has become the most powerful and influential art form of our time, but it is still very new. This course will trace the history of film from its beginnings in the silent era to modern day classics.

We will start with some of the great trailblazing silent films such as Battleship Potemkin (1925), The General (1926) and Metropolis (1927). (We’ll also see some great silent comedians such as Harold Lloyd). We’ll then look at the dawn of the “talkies,” starting with The Jazz Singer (1927).

Then I’ll choose films from the ‘30s and ‘40s that best capture the artistry and tenor of the times. You can be assured that my all-time favorite film, The Third Man (1949), will be included. We will look at various genres such as film noir and look at how Hollywood represented (and aided) the war effort in such movies as Mrs. Miniver (1942).

The ‘50s have come to be known as Hollywood’s Golden Age. We’ll look at the studio system, the introduction of color, the vibrant musicals of this era. We’ll note how directors begin to push out into the world, making films in exotic locales such as The African Queen (1951) and Bridge Over the River Kwai (1957).

We’ll follow films as they became grittier and edgier in the ‘60s, starting with movies like The Manchurian Candidate (1962). We will see how the ‘70s was the decade when many of the most successful directors in Hollywood today got their start, with films such as American Graffiti (1973) and The Godfather (1972).
We will watch a film in each class and afterward discuss, among other things, its themes, the cinematography and the contribution it made to the evolution of the art. Grading will be based on participation in class discussion and one paper for each semester that analyzes either one particular film, or a particular era or genre.